ENGINEERING STEELS


Round
Plate
Sheet
Flat
Square Bar
Hexagon
Angle
Tube
Profiles

 

Engineering Steels
Engineering Steels
Engineering Steels

Steel is an alloy of iron that contains a small amount of carbon, much less than cast iron and usually less than 1.7%. In general the tightly controlled carbon content determines how easily the steel can be hardened by heat treatments. Other alloying elements such as nickel or chromium can also be added to steel to create a wide variety of desirable characteristics.

Steel is usually separated into at least three groups. The most common groupings are: mild steels, carbon steels and alloy steels, each group having different overall attributes. Alloy steels use additional elements to greatly expand the physical and mechanical properties that steel can achieve. The addition of more than 10% chromium produces stainless steel.

Nearest Equivalent Specification

Available Products

EN1A

A free cutting steel suitable for applications where good machinability and a good surface finish is required. The small amount of added lead improves machining with little effect on mechanical properties.

BS

230M07

EN3B

A general purpose steel suitable for mechanical and allied engineering applications that will not be heavily stressed. Machinability and weldability are both good and it can be case-hardened.

BS

080A15

EN8

A medium carbon steel that finds many applications where the mechanical properties required are just above those offered by the mild steels yet the expense of an alloy steel cannot be justified.

BS

080M40

EN16

A manganese molybdenum steel that has excellent ductility and good machinability. It has a high tensile strength as well an ability to withstand shock loading.

BS

605M36

EN19

A direct hardening alloy steel containing approximately 1% chromium. Good ductility combined with good tensile strength and shock resistance. Hardening produced high wear resistance.

BS
ISO

708M40
42CrMo4

EN24

A 1.5% nickel chrome, direct hardening steel that has high strength and toughness. It finds many applications where high strength and impact resistance are requirements such axels, crankshafts and gears.

BS
ISO

817M40
34CrNiMo6

EN32

A case hardening simple carbon steel with a hard wearing surface making it suitable for many low stress applications where an alloy steel is not required.

BS

080M15
 

EN36

A nickel-chrome case hardening alloy steel for use in heavy duty applications such as rollers, gears and cams. High strengths can be achieved by carburising and hardening.

BS

655M13
 

EN40B

A chromium-molybdenum nitriding steel containing around 3% chromium. Hardening produces a highly wear resistant surface with good shock resistance. Ductility remains good.

BS

722M24
 

EN41

A chromium aluminium molybdenum nitriding steel containing around 1.5% chromium. High internal strength can be combined with a hard nitrided surface.

BS

905M31
 

Other Steels

See Aerospace Steel Bar, Maraging Steel and Special Steels.